From the archives: New social network aims to help anxiety sufferers

Note: This post originally appeared on Stanford Medicine’s award-winning medical blog, Scope.  This is being archived here for professional posterity.

A new social network called AnxietySocialNet aims to help people suffering from anxiety disorders address their symptoms, find information and network with others.

Founded by Salomon Ptasevich, a former anxiety sufferer, the site also hopes to attract friends and family members who may be watching a loved one struggle with anxiety who feel helpless or confused about how to help. In a WebWire news release, Ptasevich explains:

The whole idea behind ASN is to allow people to share their emotions in a safe place and learn from each other’s experiences. We try to encourage users to get themselves out there and conquer their anxiety.

AnxietySocialNet hopes to help sufferers of agoraphobia, social anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder or any of the other forms of anxiety affecting many. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that anxiety disorders affect as many as 40 million Americans age 18 or older.

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From the archives: Smaller plates may not be helpful tools for dieters, study suggests

Note: This post originally appeared on Stanford Medicine’s award-winning medical blog, Scope.  This is being archived here for professional posterity.

Dieters advised to use a smaller dinner plate may find themselves without much weight loss success, or so says findings recently published  in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics.

In the study (subscription required), 10 overweight and 10 normal weight women participated in the study; each was randomly assigned to dine with either an 8.5-inch or a 10.8-inch dinner plate. Told to eat until they felt satisfied, the women were studied over one meal (lunch) on two different days and each used a different-sized plate every time they ate.

The plate size did not affect the amount of calories that participants ate at either meal. However, overweight/obese women in the study reported feeling less hungry prior to the meal and less full afterward.

Reading the results, I’m left wondering whether a longer study would have told a different story or if more direction about what to eat would have made a difference. But you can read more about the study in this HealthDay News story.